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Gaseous Radiation Detectors: Status, Trends and Applications

May 26 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Progress in micro-fabrication technology has facilitated the development of radiation detectors capable of economically covering large detection volumes with a low material budget. Besides their widespread use in particle-physics and nuclear-physics experiments, gaseous detectors are employed in many other fields: astro-particle research and applications. The invention of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors (MPGD), in particular the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM), the Micro-Mesh Gaseous Structure (Micromegas), and more recently other micro pattern detector schemes, offers the potential to develop new gaseous detectors with unprecedented spatial resolution, high rate capability, large sensitive area, operational stability and radiation hardness. Given these recent developments, particle detection through the ionization of gas has resulted in large fields of application in future upgrades of particle, nuclear and astro-particle physics experiments. In my IEEE distinguished lecture, I will focus on MPGDs and their applications for high-energy particle physics and societal applications such as medical imaging, material science, and homeland security.

Speaker(s): Archana Sharma ,

Agenda:

Progress in micro-fabrication technology has facilitated the development of radiation detectors capable of economically covering large detection volumes with a low material budget. Besides their widespread use in particle-physics and nuclear-physics experiments, gaseous detectors are employed in many other fields: astro-particle research and applications. The invention of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors (MPGD), in particular the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM), the Micro-Mesh Gaseous Structure (Micromegas), and more recently other micro pattern detector schemes, offers the potential to develop new gaseous detectors with unprecedented spatial resolution, high rate capability, large sensitive area, operational stability and radiation hardness. Given these recent developments, particle detection through the ionization of gas has resulted in large fields of application in future upgrades of particle, nuclear and astro-particle physics experiments. In my IEEE distinguished lecture, I will focus on MPGDs and their applications for high-energy particle physics and societal applications such as medical imaging, material science, and homeland security.

Location:
Room: 430
Bldg: Engineering Office Wing (EOW)
University of Victoria
Victoria, BC, Canada , British Columbia

Details

Date:
May 26
Time:
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Website:
Register today!

Organizer

ljilja@cs.sfu.ca